Smart growth

Sprawling development requires increased municipal staff and significant and expensive infrastructure investments to provide services such as roads, sewer, and water. Strong neighborhoods -- which provide a range of housing options giving people the opportunity to choose housing that best suits them.

Maximize energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities.

Smart Growth America

Examples include subsidies for highway building, fossil fuels, and electricity. Public health[ edit ] Transit-oriented development can improve the quality of life and encourage a healthier, pedestrian-based lifestyle with less pollution.

They conserve resources by reinvesting in existing infrastructure and rehabilitating historic buildings. When housing is located away from jobs and commercial centers, driving is often the only transportation option, and this reliance on one form of transportation can become a huge burden.

This sometimes requires local governmental bodies to implement code changes that allow increased height and density downtown and regulations that not only eliminate minimum parking requirements for new development but establish a maximum number of allowed spaces.

Make regulatory and permitting processes for development clear, predictable, coordinated, and timely in accordance with smart growth and environmental stewardship. Create walkable neighborhoods and a range of housing opportunities and choices Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place Preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty, and critical environmental areas Strengthen and direct development towards existing communities Provide in advance a variety of transportation choices, urban and social infrastructure based on population projections Make development decisions sustainable, predictable, fair, and cost effective Encourage community and stakeholder collaboration in development decisions History[ edit ] Transportation and community planners Smart growth to promote the idea of compact cities and communities and adopt many of the regulatory approaches associated with Smart Growth in the early s.

This runoff, which often contains toxic chemicals, phosphorus and nitrogen, is the second most common source of water pollution for lakes and estuaries nationwide and the third most common source for rivers. Route 30 Master Plan What is Smart Growth Smart growth is development that serves the economy, the community and the environment.

About Smart Growth

Sprawl also comes with a heavy environmental cost. Electrical subsidies[ edit ] With electricity, there is a cost associated with extending and maintaining the service delivery system, as with water and sewage, but there also is a loss in the commodity being delivered.

More and more citizens are turning to smart growth to protect their valuable open spaces. Based on the experience of communities around the nation that have used smart growth approaches to create and maintain great neighborhoods, the Smart Growth Network developed a set of 10 basic principles to guide smart growth strategies: Smart growth provides the choice to walk, ride a bike, take transit, or drive.

It also preserves open space and other environmental amenities. Public health[ edit ] Transit-oriented development can improve the quality of life and encourage a healthier, pedestrian-based lifestyle with less pollution.

Smart Growth

By designing neighborhoods that have homes near shops, offices, schools, houses of worship, parks, and other amenities, communities give residents and visitors the option of walking, bicycling, taking public transportation, or driving as they go about their business.

Smart growth can help us to build on the competitive advantage of our charming communities instead of encouraging sprawling growth that is typical across America. For example, in the state of Massachusetts smart growth is enacted by a combination of techniques including increasing housing density along transit nodes, conserving farm land, and mixing residential and commercial use areas.

Examples include subsidies for highway building, fossil fuels, and electricity. Make development decisions predictable, fair, and cost effective. The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities recently proposed a revised rule that presents a tiered approach to utility financing.

Water Quality -- Smart growth, with its emphasis on compact development and open space preservation, can protect water quality by creating fewer paved surfaces; a one-acre parking lot generates 16 times more polluted stormwater runoff than a one-acre meadow. A range of different housing types makes it possible for senior citizens to stay in their neighborhoods as they age, young people to afford their first home, and families at all stages in between to find a safe, attractive home they can afford.

The state is developing a series of incentives to coax local governments into changing zoning laws that will be compatible with the state plan. Create a range of housing opportunities and choices. It maintains and enhances the value of existing neighborhoods and creates a sense of community.

They conserve resources by reinvesting in existing infrastructure and rehabilitating historic buildings. Make development decisions predictable, fair, and cost effective. Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place. Strengthen and direct development towards existing communities.

We work with local, state, and national experts to discover and encourage development strategies that protect human health and the environment, create economic opportunities, and provide attractive and affordable neighborhoods for people of all income levels.

We are consuming far more land than necessary to accommodate our growth needs. Air and water quality are also threatened by increased vehicle trips, increased runoff, and new demand for water.

There are a range of best practices associated with smart growth, these include: The Congress for the New Urbanismwith architect Peter Calthorpepromoted and popularized the idea of urban villages that relied on public transportation, bicycling, and walking instead of automobile use.

Maintain and expand transportation options that maximize mobility, reduce congestion, conserve fuel and improve air quality.

In areas not designated for growth, utilities and their ratepayers are forbidden to cover the costs of extending utility lines to new developmentsā€”and developers will be required to pay the full cost of public utility infrastructure. Harnessing of the power of river flows to produce electricity.

Analysis shows that a more balanced pattern of growth may be a tremendous benefit to the environment. Recent research has demonstrated that less dense neighborhoods have human health consequences as well. What is the Smart Growth Network? The Smart Growth Network works to encourage development that boost the economy, enhances community vitality and protects the environment through its.

Smart growth is a way to build cities, towns, and neighborhoods that are economically prosperous, socially equitable, and environmentally sustainable. "Smart growth" covers a range of development and conservation strategies that help protect our health and natural environment and make our communities more attractive, economically stronger, and more socially diverse.

Development decisions affect many of the things that touch people's everyday lives. Smart Growth on the Rise Smart Growth promotes a shift in the conventional development patterns, and reaches out across disciplines. It is surprising the extent to which a wide variety of professionals, elected officials and individuals recognize that the ability to address development challenges and serious contemporary problems is dependent on a new vision of metropolitan and regional.

Javascript is required. Please enable javascript before you are allowed to see this page. Smart growth is a way to build cities, towns, and neighborhoods that are economically prosperous, socially equitable, and environmentally sustainable.

Smart growth
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Smart Growth - What is Smart Growth